SPOTLIGHT ON BMI

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According to the Sightlines project, 36 percent of Americans were classified as obese in 2011– 5% more than in the previous decade. The largest increase was observed among Latinos, up 12 percent from 1999 to 2011. The number of obese married Millennials rose from 23% in 1999 to 33% in 2011, closing the gap with unmarried Millennials of whom 32% were obese at both time points.

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BMI IN THE NEWS

Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood Increases Risk of Transitioning to Obesity

American Journal of Preventive Medicine

AFFILIATE SPOTLIGHT

LISA GOLDMAN ROSAS, PhD, MPH
Instructor of Medicine
Stanford Prevention Research Center

rosas-01Lisa Goldman Rosas, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an Instructor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center where she is also the Research Director for the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices. Read more

To connect with our faculty affiliates, please contact SCL managing director, Rika Bosmans (rbosmans@stanford.edu)

EXPLORE THE DATA

PERCENTAGE OF AMERICANS WHO ARE OBESE IN 2011 COMPARED TO 1999

COMMENTARY

BEYOND BMI: ASSESSING WEIGHT STATUS AS WE AGE

Body mass index, or BMI, is a common weight-for-height measure used to classify individuals by weight status—as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. Because of its relevance to longevity, weight status is a key measure in the Sightlines project.

Many trends in the Sightlines data on BMI merit investigation, one of which is the finding that Americans in the oldest age group (adults 75+) are most likely to have healthy BMI’s. Why might this be the case? Are older adults adopting better lifestyle habits? Is it easier to maintain a healthy body weight as one ages? Actually, research suggests these numbers may be misleading…Read more

DARYTH GAYLES

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