The developed world is bearing witness to a 21st century miracle – the real possibility of living well to the age of 100 and beyond. Compelling scientific evidence indicates that living long and living well is most realistic for those who adopt healthy behaviors, are financially secure, and are socially engaged.

THE SIGHTLINES PROJECT investigates how well Americans are doing in each of these three areas over historical time. We assessed the number of Americans who are meeting expert recommendations for healthy living, financial security, and social engagement. These results are intended to stir national debate, guide policy development, stimulate entrepreneurial innovation, and encourage personal choices that enhance independent, 100-year lives.

overall-index

Change over historical time in % Americans who are doing well in healthy living, financial security and social engagement across six different age groups; dashed lines represent 5 percentage point change which we classified as significant.

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SIGHTLINES DIRECTOR’S POST

THE SIGHTLINES PROJECT: 10 YEARS IN THE MAKING

Long before the Sightlines project was a glimmer in the eye of the Stanford Center on Longevity, Laura Carstensen and her team were puzzling over how to ensure people arrive at old age physically fit, mentally sharp, and financially secure. Over the years, a small and mighty team has made incredible strides to this end –evaluating scientific evidence, convening experts from around the globe, and educating the masses on both the challenges to aging as well as the opportunities it provides. Their mission: to ensure a long, bright future for all.

It became clear that our shifting culture in response to this new era of longevity needed to be quantified.  There was no measure of whether long-lived societies were on the right track or the wrong track. As a result, it was difficult to ascertain who we should help, or how.  Within each of its three core divisions, SCL offered cohesive stories about innovation and behavior in mobility, mind, and financial security. A large focus of this work, however, was on old age because this is the stage in life where it seemed people needed the most support. Why? Because old age as a population is a new phenomenon for which we are sorely underprepared. Thus, SCL spent much of its first 10 years

curating key insights into this relatively untapped market.

As the center evolved, so too did its view of longevity. It was impossible to ignore several persistent observations:

  1. Longevity is not only an issue for the aged, but one that requires care and feeding throughout the entire life span from the cradle to…READ MORE

sashab

TAMARA SIMS, PhD
DIRECTOR OF THE SIGHTLINES PROJECT

SIGHTLINES IN THE NEWS

The Sightlines Project was made possible by the generous support of the following sponsors:

Bank of America Merrill Lynch | Prudential | Society of Actuaries | Transamerica | James A. Johnson

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