SPOTLIGHT ON HOME
OWNERSHIP

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Data analyzed for the Sightlines project indicates that over one-third of Americans do not own a home. Married Americans are much more likely to be homeowners than those who are unmarried. Notably, unlike younger age groups, older adults are as likely to own a home today as they were before the financial crisis hit in 2007.

Home ownership heat map

Hover over map to enlarge 

HOME OWNERSHIP IN THE NEWS

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

SEPIDEH MODREK
Assistant Professor of Economics
San Francisco State University, College of Business

sepideh-modrekDr. Modrek’s work examines the nexus of health, income, and wealth using econometric techniques. Her projects aim to elucidate how changes in social circumstance lead to changes in health.

“The timing of marriage and childbearing are strongly related to homeownership and these life events are highly interrelated. As younger cohorts delay or forego marriage, these cultural and sociodemographic changes are also likely to have an effect on homeownership.”

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To connect with our faculty affiliates, please contact SCL managing director, Rika Bosmans (rbosmans@stanford.edu)

EXPLORE THE DATA

PERCENTAGE OF AMERICANS WHO ARE HOMEOWNERS

FINANCIAL SECURITY DIRECTOR’S POST

DO YOUNGER PEOPLE WANT TO BUY HOUSES ANYMORE?

Home ownership has always been heralded as the great American dream but it appears to be a dream that is slow to be realized by younger generations of Americans. Between 1950 and 2005, home ownership rates rose fairly consistently, from 50% to 68.9%, with the exception of the 1980’s where rates remained essentially flat. Since the peak in 2005, overall home ownership has fallen to 63.7%, the same rate as 1980. While each age group under 75 has experienced declines, those potential home buyers between 25-44 have seen the most dramatic changes of all, experiencing more than an 8% decline in home ownership between 2000 and 2014….Read more

MARTHA DEEVYdeevy
DIRECTOR OF THE FINANCIAL SECURITY DIVISION

COMMENTARY

IS DIPPING HOMEOWNERSHIP HERE TO STAY?

In the United States, the homeownership rate has been fluctuating in the 60-70 percent range over the past half a century.[1] The rate rose slowly but steadily throughout the 1960s and 1970s, before receding to a relatively stable 64% during the late 1980s and early 1990s. At the turn of the millennium, a pronounced boom-bust cycle for the housing market occurred, where homeownership reached an all-time high of 69% in 2005. After the financial crisis in 2006, home ownership has been steadily declining, falling to 63% as of the second quarter of 2016, the lowest level since 1965…Read more

JIALU STREETERjialu_streeter-01
ECONOMIST

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