The active grandparent hypothesis: Physical activity and the evolution of extended human healthspans and lifespans – PNAS

The active grandparent hypothesis: Physical activity and the evolution of extended human healthspans and lifespans – PNAS

Just about everyone knows that exercise is good for you. Some people can even rattle off reasons it keeps your muscles and joints strong, and how it fights off certain diseases. But how many people can tell you the story of why and how physical activity was built into human biology?

A team of evolutionary biologists and biomedical researchers from Harvard are taking a run at it (sometimes literally) in a new study published this week in PNAS. The work lays out evolutionary and biomedical evidence showing that humans, who evolved to live many decades after they stopped reproducing, also evolved to be relatively active in their later years.

Blood test predicts recovery after hip-replacement surgery, study finds – Stanford Medicine

Blood test predicts recovery after hip-replacement surgery, study finds – Stanford Medicine

Clues from a blood sample can predict how quickly patients who have had hip-replacement surgery will make a full recovery, according to a new study led by Stanford Medicine researchers.

Digital Care for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: 10,000 Participant Longitudinal Cohort Study

Digital Care for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: 10,000 Participant Longitudinal Cohort Study

A total of 10,264 adults with either knee (n=3796) or low back (n=6468) pain for at least three months were included in the study. Participants experienced a 68.45% average improvement in VAS pain between baseline intake and 12 weeks. In all, 73.04% (7497/10,264) participants completed the DCP into the final month. In total, 78.60% (5893/7497) of program completers (7144/10,264, 69.60% of all participants) achieved minimally important change in pain. Furthermore, the number of ET sessions and coaching interactions were both positively associated with improvement in pain, suggesting that the amount of engagement influenced outcomes. Secondary outcomes included a 57.9% and 58.3% decrease in depression and anxiety scores, respectively, and 61.5% improvement in work productivity. Finally, 3 distinct clusters of pain response trajectories were identified, which could be predicted with a mean 76% accuracy using baseline measures.

Breaking Up Sitting Time—Should We Stand Up, Sit Down or Keep Moving? – ACSM

Breaking Up Sitting Time—Should We Stand Up, Sit Down or Keep Moving? – American College of Sports Medicine

Moving Toward a Better Balance: Stanford School of Medicine’s Lifestyle Medicine Course Is Spearheading the Promotion of Health and Wellness in Medicine

Stanford School of Medicine’s Lifestyle Medicine Course Is Spearheading the Promotion of Health and Wellness in Medicine

On Your Birthday, You’re Not Celebrating What You Think – Nautilus

On Your Birthday, You’re Not Celebrating What You Think – Nautilus

Have you had a birthday recently? Feeling old? Don’t worry—there’s a good chance that you’re younger than your infant self.

As an adult, you have billions more new cells and trillions of times more new molecules than you had in your body when you were born. Your body now has day-old cells, year-old cells, and only a relatively small proportion of decades-old cells (found in parts of your brain). Most of your body is much younger than the day you were born.