The Single Best Spartan-Approved Exercise to Prevent Knee Injuries – Spartan

The Single Best Spartan-Approved Exercise to Prevent Knee Injuries – Spartan

One thing to be mindful of is not coming back to obstacle racing too soon after an injury without taking proper precautions. “Overuse injuries occur in the muscles and tendons and are probably more common in Spartan Racers,” says Dr. Michael Fredericson, Director of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) Sports Medicine in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center. “Returning to high-intensity athletics from an overuse injury too early won’t necessarily predispose you to arthritis, but if you have a ligament tear, those are usually traumatic. Coming back from one of those too soon can cause arthritic problems because of the unstabilized and unequal forces on your knee.”

Resistance Exercise May Be Best Workout for a Good Night’s Sleep

Resistance Exercise May Be Best Workout for a Good Night’s Sleep – Medscape

A randomized trial suggests resistance exercise promotes better sleep than other workouts among inactive adults, particularly those who are poor sleepers.

Strength Training May Be Better Than Cardio for Improving Sleep, Study Suggests – Iowa State University

Strength Training May Be Better Than Cardio for Improving Sleep, Study Suggests – Iowa State University

If you’re looking to up your workout’s sleep-boosting effects, try strength training, new data says.

Also known as resistance training, it helps you build muscle and improve flexibility, posture, and bone density. Now new research suggests strength training trumps cardio when it comes to better sleep outcomes.

The new data from researchers at Iowa State University found that for people struggling with sleep who were previously sedentary and overweight, consistent strength training workouts helped with falling asleep faster, staying asleep longer, and feeling rested and refreshed the next day compared with aerobic workouts or not exercising at all.

 

Daily steps and all-cause mortality – The Lancet

Daily steps and all-cause mortality – The Lancet

The number of steps we take each day is often recommended to have health advantages, but evidence to back up this claim is still somewhat lacking. A new meta-analysis set out to examine the link between daily step count and all-cause mortality.

They analyzed the association of steps per day with all-cause mortality and calculated a hazard ratio to describe the association. As steps increased, the risk of mortality progressively decreased. The target numbers were found to be around 6000-8000 steps per day for those aged 60+, while adults younger than 60 years should put in some more work at 8000-10000 steps.

Remember, if you don’t use it you lose it. Get moving!