Returning to Physical Activity After COVID-19 – ACSM

Returning to Physical Activity After COVID-19 – ACSM

People who get COVID-19 can have different experiences. Some have no symptoms. Others have severe symptoms leading to hospitalization. Common symptoms may include fever, chills, chest pain, shortness of breath, cough, loss of smell and taste, rash, cold-like symptoms, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, headache and/or muscle aches.

Fiber Boosts Melanoma Treatment – ScienceDaily

Fiber Boosts Melanoma Treatment – Science

A high-fiber diet may improve patients’ response to immunotherapy treatment for melanoma. That’s the conclusion of a large international study led by researchers at the University of Texas and the National Institutes of Health. The fifth most common type of cancer in the United States, melanoma is also the deadliest form of skin cancer, responsible for more than 7,000 deaths every year. Immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy uses certain drugs to block proteins produced by some malignant cells, which allows the immune system to better fight cancer.

A Helping Hand Could Be Good For Health – WEIL

A Helping Hand Could Be Good For Health – Brain, Behavior, and Immunity

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159121005985?via%3DihubWhen it comes to social support, helping your significant other, family, and friends may be just as beneficial to your health as it is to those receiving that support. For one recent study, researchers at Ohio State University reviewed data from more than 1,000 healthy adults ages 34 to 84 who were participating in the large follow-up of the National Survey of Midlife Development in the U.S. The volunteers completed questionnaires about their social lives and answered questions about how much they could rely on their friends, family, or spouse for help. Two years later, the respondents underwent various blood tests, including one that measured interleukin-6 (IL-6), a marker of inflammation that is associated with an increased risk of many chronic conditions, including cardiovascular disease and cancer

The active grandparent hypothesis: Physical activity and the evolution of extended human healthspans and lifespans – PNAS

The active grandparent hypothesis: Physical activity and the evolution of extended human healthspans and lifespans – PNAS

Just about everyone knows that exercise is good for you. Some people can even rattle off reasons it keeps your muscles and joints strong, and how it fights off certain diseases. But how many people can tell you the story of why and how physical activity was built into human biology?

A team of evolutionary biologists and biomedical researchers from Harvard are taking a run at it (sometimes literally) in a new study published this week in PNAS. The work lays out evolutionary and biomedical evidence showing that humans, who evolved to live many decades after they stopped reproducing, also evolved to be relatively active in their later years.

Blood from marathoner mice boosts brain function in their couch-potato counterparts – Stanford Medicine

Blood from marathoner mice boosts brain function in their couch-potato counterparts – Stanford Medicine

In a Stanford study, sedentary mice appear to benefit from another same-aged mouse’s exercise — if they receive injections of its blood.

The flavonoid procyanidin C1 has senotherapeutic activity and increases lifespan in mice – Nature

The flavonoid procyanidin C1 has senotherapeutic activity and increases lifespan in mice – Nature

Ageing-associated functional decline of organs and increased risk for age-related chronic pathologies is driven in part by the accumulation of senescent cells, which develop the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Here we show that procyanidin C1 (PCC1), a polyphenolic component of grape seed extract (GSE), increases the healthspan and lifespan of mice through its action on senescent cells. By screening a library of natural products, we find that GSE, and PCC1 as one of its active components, have specific effects on senescent cells. At low concentrations, PCC1 appears to inhibit SASP formation, whereas it selectively kills senescent cells at higher concentrations, possibly by promoting production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction.