SPOTLIGHT ON RETIREMENT

Findings from the Sightlines Project show that only 53% of 25-34 year old Americans have a retirement plan, many of which are likely employer-sponsored default plans. In 2001, 35-44 year old Hispanic Americans were on par with the rest of the country, with 54% having retirement plans, but in 2013 only 26% do, despite no decline in percent working for pay. In contrast, there are 11% more 65-74 year old women with retirement plans in 2013 compared to 2001, likely because there are more women working at this stage of life today than previous generations.

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RETIREMENT IN THE NEWS

The Mental Mistakes We Make With Retirement Spending

The Wall Street Journal

Social Security: Suicide Prevention Tool

Pacific Standard

The Biggest Surprises in Retirement

Wall Street Journal

How Does Student Debt Affect Early-Career Retirement Saving?

Center for Retirement Research at Boston College

Pulling Retirement Cash, but Not by Choice

The Wall Street Journal

Is student loan debt associated with less retirement savings?

Center for Retirement Research at Boston College

Planning Ahead or Living a Day at a Time? A Family History of AD and Retirement Planning

American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias

SCL AFFILIATE SPOTLIGHT

DR. GOPI SHAH GODA
Deputy Director and Senior Fellow
Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

In addition to being the Deputy Director and a Senior Fellow of SIEPR, Professor Gopi Shah Goda is also a Faculty Research Fellow of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research involves investigating the economics of aging, including its relation to topics such as policy making and retirement. Her work also offers insight into caregiving and insurance, and investigates how these factors can affect all age groups. In her interview with the Center on Longevity, Dr. Gopi Shah Goda gives us her perspective on how retirement planning can affect anyone from millennials to those already taking advantage of their savings. Bio

“The idea that you can support a 20-year retirement with 30 years of work is—is outdated. And can’t continue. It’s just not sustainable.”

“I think that there’s a lot of hope in terms of the way that we can potentially train younger individuals to think about saving in a more holistic way that could have impacts on saving for the future.”

To connect with our faculty affiliates, please contact SCL managing director, Rika Bosmans (rbosmans@stanford.edu)

EXPLORE THE DATA

PERCENT OF AMERICANS WITH RETIREMENT PLANS

SIGHTLINES COMMENTARY

REBOUND RETIREES

Retirement is no longer a one-time, enduring occurrence. Increasing numbers of Americans are retiring from jobs when they turn 60 or 65 only to boomerang back to work after a pause. Some return to their former workplaces as either part-time or contract employees, while others find new jobs. An abrupt retirement, in fact, that continues for the rest of one’s life is becoming the… Read more

CAROL HYMOWITZ
JOURNALIST AND AUTHOR

Millennials are now the largest generation of Americans, surpassing the Baby Boom generation in sheer numbers. Their financial situation is gaining much attention, with concerns about student debt, modest recovery of the job market for millennials, and delay of home purchases and saving for retirement. Many millennials are entering their late 20s and early 30s, and it’s inevitable that they would turn their attention to saving for retirement. They may be asked to … Read more

STEVE VERNON
FSA, CENTER ON LONGEVITY

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