About one-third of dementia cases could be prevented by actions that begin in childhood – LA Times

RESEARCH PROJECTS

IN-DEPTH RESEARCH

Within each area, we will focus in on some of the most compelling findings of the initial Sightlines report. These projects range in approach and include webpages highlighting informative and timely news stories and research studies on select topics, comprehensive reviews of the academic literature, analysis of existing datasets, survey and experimental studies, and randomized interventions.

Below are select examples of projects currently underway within and across domains:

Healthy Living

Improving Diet through Institutional Change (Dr. Christopher Gardner)
In partnership with the Culinary Institute of America, evaluation of dietary change by offering and normalizing healthy menu options through various institutions
Supported by SPECTRUM, Stanford School of Medicine

24-hours of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Sleep with Wearable Devices (Dr. Mary Rosenberger)

Description of the 24-hour activity cycle, why it is important for health, where the data is being collected, and how researchers are currently using the data to answer public health questions.

Living Long, Living Well among the Chronically Ill
Sub-group analysis of people with chronic illness to determine the prevalence of healthy living, social engagement, and financial security and their impact on quality of life and longevity

Financial Security

Shifting Life Milestones across Generations
Examining timing of life events and financial milestones among Millennials and Boomers by gender and education and generational differences in life event drivers of financial milestones
Supported by Fidelity Investments

Retirement Adequacy and Preparedness across Contexts
Both an investigation of Boomers entering retirement with more debt and less equity than previous generations and a re-examination of retirement adequacy thresholds adjusted by changing needs and values of diverse American groups

Motivating Financial Planning and Healthy Living in Early Adulthood using Age-progression Technology (collaboration with Dr. Jeremy Bailenson)
Experimental research estimating the effects of age progression technology on motivating financial planning and health behaviors among young adults
Supported by National Institute on Aging

Social Engagement

Benefits of Volunteering When it Matters (collaboration with Santa Clara County)
Experimental study examining effective methods of recruiting and retaining volunteers for meaningful experiences and the subsequent impact on social engagement and healthy living
Supported by National Institute on Aging

Caregivers’ Social Engagement and Well-being (collaboration with Comfort Keepers and Clear Care)
Survey study of Comfort Keepers clients who have arranged for supplemental care of a loved one in the home to assess their emotional well-being and social engagement

Potential of Social Technologies for Promoting Well-being across the Life Span
Using the Sightlines framework, survey of use of social applications and devices, purpose of use, and associations with healthy living, social engagement, and financial security; initial project focused on potential benefits of using technology to connect with loved ones among the oldest-old
Initial Project Support from Brookdale Senior Living

To learn more about how to get involved with the Sightlines Project, please contact:

Nancy Easterbrook
neasterb@stanford.edu
(650) 721-7997

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