Storybooks Get Kids to Eat Their Veggies

Sarah Gripshover and Ellen Markman, both developmental psychologists, first created a series of five storybooks to teach young children about nutrition. The books show how the body uses a variety of nutrients from different foods to power diverse biological functions.

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Stanford researchers aim to create global conversations about long, healthy living

The Stanford Center on Longevity’s new, interactive website is designed to further research and to encourage officials, entrepreneurs and members of the public to think about ways of redesigning the human life.

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Retirement Wellness: Toward a More Complete Framework

A Stanford Center on Longevity project with support from the Society of Actuaries recently drew up a road map for thinking about living long and living well in America. Results identified three domains for successful living in old age: healthy living, financial security and social engagement.

My own approach to retirement wellness includes these three domains, but I also believe it’s critical to add two more: having suitable housing, and being passionate about something.

Read the full article at Forbes.

U.S. Surgeon General and the National Prevention Council release Healthy Aging in Action: Advancing the National Prevention Strategy

Healthy Aging in Action (HAIA) identifies recommendations and actions to promote healthy aging and improve health and well-being in later life. HAIA highlights federal and nonfederal policies and programs that reflect the National Prevention Strategy’s approach of targeting prevention and wellness efforts to promote healthy aging to further advance the Strategy for an aging society.

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Seizing Longevity’s Competitive Advantages

“The aging megatrend could generate massive opportunities. We are at the beginning of a longevity revolution. The aging megatrend — caused by increased life expectancies and plummeting birthrates — will disrupt traditional working norms, challenge virtually all businesses and transform society’s structure.

Conventional thinking holds that this upheaval will trigger an economic calamity. The workforce will wither, savings will disappear and markets will collapse.

To the contrary, I believe aging could generate the most significant economic opportunity of our lifetimes.”

Read the full article by Andrew Sieg at Next Avenue.