Sudden Drops in Blood Pressure May Increase Risk of Dementia – Medical News Today

Dementia affects tens of millions of people in the United States. New research suggests that those who experience sudden blood pressure drops in their middle age may be more likely to develop dementia in old age.

Read more

Researchers Shift Focus to Prevention of Alzheimer’s – The Globe and Mail

It’s been 10 years since Vancouver resident Jim Mann was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. In that time, multiple experimental drugs have emerged with new hopes of beating back his disease. Yet none has resulted in a viable clinical treatment.

Read more

Employers are Trying to Solve Their Workers’ Retirement Income Problem –MarketWatch

We already know the bad news: The disappearance of traditional pension plans has contributed to a retirement crisis in the U.S., in part because of increased risk that an investor will outlive her savings. Anyone lucky enough to have a retirement plan at work these days — more than one-third of private-sector workers lack access will likely have a defined-contribution plan, such as a 401(k). Those plans can present big hurdles come retirement time, when investors must determine how much they can safely withdraw so their nest egg lasts long enough. Now, some better news: Private-sector companies are waking up to the problem.

Read more

IBM Wants to Protect Senior Citizens by Tracking Nearly Their Every Move – Business Insider

Over the last several years, the computing giant has spent much of its time researching ways to keep America’s second-largest generation happy and healthy in old age. That research has zeroed in on outfitting boomers’ living spaces with artificially-intelligent sensors that can measure things like air quality, sleep quality, movement patterns, falls, and changes in scent and sound.

Read more

The Retirement Crisis Facing African Americans – Forbes

There’s a saying: When white America catches a cold, black America catches pneumonia. So, if there is an impending retirement crisis in America, what does that mean for African Americans? The answer to that question is discouraging.

Read more

Diabetes Drug Might Help Detect and Treat Alzheimer’s Disease – Pharmaceutical Processing

As the number of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) rapidly increases, new treatments as well as blood tests that are simple and can be easily performed in a doctor’s office to diagnose are urgently needed. A new study has found treatment with the diabetes drug amylin (or pramlintide) safely improves learning and memory function in AD patients and reduces the AD pathology in their brains.

Read more

Big Alzheimer’s Research Roadblock: Federal government – CNBC

Promising new research conducted last year at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has shown that marijuana extracts may hold a key to treating Alzheimer’s disease. The next step: To conduct tests on mice and, if the results are promising, move on to human trials. But Salk Institute researchers have run into a major hurdle, and not a scientific one: the federal government.

Read more

‘Get Out of Your Comfort Zone:’ Interval Training Benefits Extend to Aging – CBC News

Any exercise is usually considered better than no exercise, but a new study indicates interval training — interspersing high and low speed levels during activities such as biking — is best at reversing age-related declines in muscle cells.

Read more

Aging While LGBT: Unique Challenges and Inequities – U.S. News

Whether it’s transgender teens trying to find informed providers to help them navigate their life-changing physical transformations; lesbians who are less likely than others to get preventive breast-cancer care; or gay and bisexual men who had to push an indifferent health care system to respond to the early AIDS epidemic, LGBT individuals have faced many challenges in the health space. As researchers look for ways to improve LGBT health, one issue hasn’t received much attention with respect to this population, although it is an equal-opportunity process: aging.

Read more

Alzheimer’s: The Disease that Could Bankrupt Medicare – CNN

Every 66 seconds this year, an American will develop Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association annual report, released Tuesday. By the year 2050, that number is expected to double to one every 33 seconds. Those startling statistics are mirrored worldwide. In 2016, the World Alzheimer’s Report estimated that 47 million people around the globe had dementia.

Read more