The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles – The New York Times

The toll that aging takes on a body extends all the way down to the cellular level. But the damage accrued by cells in older muscles is especially severe, because they do not regenerate easily and they become weaker as their mitochondria, which produce energy, diminish in vigor and number. A study published this month in Cell Metabolism, however, suggests that certain sorts of workouts may undo some of what the years can do to our mitochondria.

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Molecule Kills Elderly Cells, Reduces Signs of Aging in Mice – Science

Even if you aren’t elderly, your body is home to agents of senility—frail and damaged cells that age us and promote disease. Now, researchers have developed a molecule that selectively destroys these so-called senescent cells. The compound makes old mice act and appear more youthful, providing hope that it may do the same for us.

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The Forces Driving Middle-Aged White People’s “Deaths of Despair” – NPR

In 2015, when researchers Anne Case and Angus Deaton discovered that death rates had been rising dramatically since 1999 among middle-aged white Americans, they weren’t sure why people were dying younger, reversing decades of longer life expectancy. Now the husband-and-wife economists say they have a better understanding of what’s causing these “deaths of despair” by suicide, drugs and alcohol.

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Renters Now Rule Half of U.S. Cities – Bloomberg

Detroit was once known as a city where a working-class family could afford to own a home. Now it’s a city of renters. Just 49 percent of Motor City households were homeowners in 2015, down from 55 percent in 2009 and the lowest percentage in more than 50 years. Detroit isn’t alone, of course: The rate of U.S. home ownership fell steadily for a decade as the foreclosure crisis turned millions of owners into renters and tight housing markets made it hard for renters to buy homes. Demographic shifts—millennials (finally) moving out of their parents basements, for instance, or a rising Hispanic population—further fed the renter pool.

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Seniors Worry Less About Finances and More About Memory Loss, Independence – The San Diego Union-Tribune

Americans may be worrying a little too much about the size of their retirement nest eggs and not enough about how they will maintain their independence and close relationships later in life, according to a large survey from the San Diego-based West Health Institute.

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1 in 4 Workers Have Less than $1,000 Saved for Retirement – CNN

Almost one-quarter of workers said they and their spouse combined have less than $1,000 saved for retirement, according to a report from the Employee Benefit Research Institute. Nearly half of everyone surveyed said they had less than $25,000. Sure, $25,000 can sound like a lot. But it’s a reasonable goal to have that much stashed away by the time you’re 30 years old. Someone in their early 30s earning $50,000 a year should have about $30,000 saved, according to one calculator. This it totally doable if that person has been saving 10% of their income annually, which is the rule-of-thumb suggested by many financial planners. But more than one-third of those surveyed said they’re saving less than that.

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Study Connects Genes to Late Onset Alzheimer’s in African-Americans – NBC News

Michelle Agaston, 63, of Pittsburg, knows all too well how quickly things can change when an elderly parent develops Alzheimer’s disease.

“We started noticing little things,” Agaston says. Her mother was diagnosed at the age of 72, twelve years ago, which instantly put her family on the journey of learning about the disease and caregiving. Her mother passed away in October of 2016. Agaston was also a caregiver for her uncle, her mother’s brother, during the same time period she and her siblings were caring for her mother. Alzheimer’s seems to run in the family — her grandfather also died from the disease. Alzheimer’s continues to take a toll on more African-American families every day.

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Dementia Not Prevented with Vitamin E, Selenium, Study Finds – Medical News Today

An ample body of research has shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. As a result, antioxidant supplements have been proposed as preventive measures against dementia. A new trial, however, tests the effect of vitamin E and selenium on aging men and finds no evidence that they have therapeutic value.

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When the Boss Is Half Your Age – The New York Times

Companies these days are looking to fill the management ranks with people who are “digital natives,” which frequently translates to millennials and Gen X-ers. Meanwhile, more baby boomers are staying on the job longer, and some retirees, looking for a second act, are rejoining the ranks of the employed, at least part time. Consequently, the odds are increasing that older workers will be answering to managers young enough to be their children.

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Here’s an ‘income menu’ that could help retirees make their savings last – MarketWatch