Storybooks Get Kids to Eat Their Veggies

Sarah Gripshover and Ellen Markman, both developmental psychologists, first created a series of five storybooks to teach young children about nutrition. The books show how the body uses a variety of nutrients from different foods to power diverse biological functions.

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How does nutrition affect children’s school performance?

From before birth and through the school years, there are decades-old food programs designed to make sure children won’t go hungry. Experts agree that the nutrition provided to millions of children through school meal programs is invaluable for their health.

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The Sleep Cure: The Fountain of Youth May Be Closer Than You Ever Thought

Scientists are learning that shortchanging sleep can compromise nearly every major body system, from the brain to the heart to the immune system, making our inability–or unwillingness–to sleep enough one of the unhealthiest things we can do.

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Obesity: Self-stigma may raise risk of metabolic syndrome

A number of studies have shown that individuals who are obese are often stereotyped as “lazy,” “lacking in willpower,” or “unattractive.” New research finds that internalizing such negative perceptions may increase the risk of metabolic syndrome for people who are obese, independent of weight.

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Poll Reveals Sleep Differences Among Ethnic Groups

The 2010  Sleep in America  poll released by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) revealed significant differences in the sleep habits and attitudes of Asians, Blacks/African-Americans, Hispanics and Whites. It is the first poll to examine sleep among these four ethnic groups.

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Steak with carrots, baked plantain and stuffed grape leaves with salad: What school lunches look like around the world (and the UK and US are the most unhealthy)

Fish soup with tofu and rice, stir-fried pork with vegetables and baked chicken with stuffed grape leaves… these are just some of the exotic lunches school children from around the world tuck into.

But in stark contrast, the UK and US lunch trays feature processed foods such as popcorn chicken, frankfurters, cookies, and beans from a tin.

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Exercise Can Be a Boon to People With Parkinson’s Disease

“The earlier people begin exercising after a Parkinson’s diagnosis, and the higher the intensity of exercise they achieve, the better they are,” Marilyn Moffat, a physical therapist on the faculty of New York University, said. “Many different activities have been shown to be beneficial, including cycling, boxing, dancing and walking forward and backward on a treadmill. If someone doesn’t like one activity, there are others that can have equally good results.”

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Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Early Childhood Obesity: Growth Trajectories in Body Mass Index

Significant racial and ethnic differences are discernible in BMI trajectories among young children. Raising parents’ and health practitioners’ awareness of how fast food and sweetened-beverage consumption contributes to early obesity and growth in BMI—especially for Blacks and Latinos—could improve the health status of young children.

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Why You Don’t Have to Exercise Every Day

Since daily exercise isn’t realistic for everyone, researchers decided to study whether people who tend to cram their weekly exercise into one or two days on the weekend (so-called “weekend warriors”) get the same benefits as those who exercise daily. In the new research published in JAMA Internal Medicine, they found that how often a person exercises might not make a difference in determining how long a person lives.

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A Gut Makeover for the New Year

If you’re making resolutions for a healthier new year, consider a gut makeover. Refashioning the community of bacteria and other microbes living in your intestinal tract, collectively known as the gut microbiome, could be a good long-term investment in your health.

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